Copper Taste in Mouth

September 10, 2014 | 0

Copper taste in your mouth is also called metallic taste or dysgeusia.  This disorder is essentially a distorted sense of taste in your mouth. Any interference of the normal taste pathway can lead to lack or change in the normal sense. Taste is essentially a combination of other senses. The taste buds in your mouth combine smell and sensory neurons then transmit the information to your brain, which then interprets it as sweet, salty, sour, or bitter.

There are approximately 10,000 taste buds at the time of birth. As you grow old, you tend to lose a substantial amount. This is the main reason why elder people can tolerate intense tastes than younger people. This sense can also be impaired by cigarette smoking and disease conditions. The most common health problems that can lead to impaired taste include but not limited to; stuffy nose due to allergies, common cold, drugs, and infections, both viral and bacterial.

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A physiological loss of taste is often experienced in pregnancy. Most of the time, metallic taste does not mean a serious disease. However, due to the other medical conditions that can cause metabolic taste, you should seek medical attention when its development is due to either infections or drugs. This is because such causes can lead to development of major health complications. You should also visit a medical doctor if it is persistent, recurs, or causes you a lot of discomfort.

copper taste in mouth

Causes of copper taste in mouth

As mentioned above, the taste process usually involves thousands of neurons that connect your taste buds and your brain. Taste is a very important sense that helps you enjoy your meals and live healthy too. Anything that causes its disturbance should therefore be avoided at all costs. The commonest cause of metallic taste in your mouth include; aging, which is due to lost taste buds; breathing through the mouth, which reduces the moisture in your mouth leaving it dry, dehydration, which denotes loss of water from your body, and smoking.

All these common causes have one thing in common; dry mouth. Keeping your oral cavity dehydrated is therefore important in preventing the development of this condition. Infections have also been shown to cause metallic taste. The most common organisms associated with this type of dysgeusia are viral and bacterial infections.

In the upper respiratory, common cold, flu and nasal infections predominate. Inflammation of the sinuses also causes metallic taste. Pharyngitis, especially by bacteria of the streptococcus origin is also implicated. Mechanical injury to the tongue, which is the sensory organ, is also known as a major predisposing factor.

Chemical injuries are also implicated. These injuries include burning or biting your tongue, chemical poisoning, especially substances containing large amount of copper, and head or nose injury. Certain medical prescription can also give you a metallic taste. These drugs include antibiotics, which are used widely in the treatment of infections.

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Drugs used for treatment of Alzeimer’s disease such as acetylcholine estarase and anti-thyroid drugs may cause that kind of taste. Other drugs implicated include drugs used in cancer chemotherapy, procarbamazine for treatment of hodgkin’s lymphoma, and rifampicin and rifampin, which are used in the treatment of tuberculosis and bacterial meningitis.

It should be noted that withdrawal of therapy usually leads to remission. Metallic condition can also be due medical conditions. Bell’s palsy, which is a neurological disorder is commonly known to cause this condition. Others include gingivitis or dental surgery, dental or orthodontic appliances, inflammation of the glottis, nasal polyps, cancer radiation therapy to the head and neck, vitamin B12 deficiency, and zinc deficiency. Treatment of these primary health problems leads to disappearance of the copper taste that you may be experiencing.

Symptoms of copper taste in mouth

This condition may occur with the altered taste as the only symptom or with other manifestations. Symptoms can be divide into various groups; minor and major. The minor symptoms rarely cause complications. These symptoms include bleeding gums, bad breath, dry mouth, excessive salivation, loss of appetite, vomiting, stuffy nose, which leads to poor sense of smell and sometimes inflamed tonsils.

The major symptoms include dysphagia or inability to swallow, change in consciousness levels and confusion, high fever, slurred speech and respiratory difficulties. Respiratory difficulties can be serious and you need to visit a doctor immediately they start manifesting. These symptoms include shortness of breath, wheezing, and choking.

If you choke and aspirate the fluid, you may end up getting a condition called pneumonitis, which complicates the manifestations further. You may also notice sudden inflammation of your mouth, lips, and the tongue especially if the cause is injury to your oral cavity structures.

Complications

This is a simple condition, which normally does not present with health complications. However, complications may occur sometimes and they are mainly related to malnutrition. There is loss of appetite and eating habits modification in these individuals due to the tasteless feeling of food. This can lead to malnutrition, weight loss, and eating of spoiled foods. There are psychological effects associated with this condition, which can lead to the development of depression and associated complications.

Copper taste in your mouth is also called metallic taste or dysgeusia.  This disorder is essentially a distorted sense of taste in your mouth. Any interference of the normal taste pathway can lead to lack or change in the normal sense. Taste is essentially a combination of other senses. The taste buds in your mouth combine smell and sensory neurons then transmit the information to your brain, which then interprets it as sweet, salty, sour, or bitter.

There are approximately 10,000 taste buds at the time of birth. As you grow old, you tend to lose a substantial amount. This is the main reason why elder people can tolerate intense tastes than younger people. This sense can also be impaired by cigarette smoking and disease conditions. The most common health problems that can lead to impaired taste include but not limited to; stuffy nose due to allergies, common cold, drugs, and infections, both viral and bacterial.

A physiological loss of taste is often experienced in pregnancy. Most of the time, metallic taste does not mean a serious disease. However, due to the other medical conditions that can cause metabolic taste, you should seek medical attention when its development is due to either infections or drugs. This is because such causes can lead to development of major health complications. You should also visit a medical doctor if it is persistent, recurs, or causes you a lot of discomfort.

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